Category Archives: Bible

Book Review: Preaching By The Book

Like many, I too sit in the pew and think about what makes for good sermon preaching. Preaching By The Book by R. Scott Pace offers those who are tasked with the sacred privilege of preaching a helpful guide that is practical as it offers fundamental guidance in the preparation process.

Preaching By The Book discusses a basic format of The Foundation, The Framework, and Finishing Touches. Foundationally, Pace argues for inspiration and investigation. Because preaching is so grounded in our theology, Pace starts by offering a really good theology of preaching. He writes, “The theological nature of preaching begins with our convictions about God and his divine self-disclosure” (5). This divine self-disclosure prompts us to investigate His Word. For this, Pace outlines a seven-step process for surveying the truth.

After laying out the foundation, Pace goes on to talk about the framework for preaching which he explains is interpretation and implementation. Here he discusses sound exegesis, textual interpretation, theological understanding, and relevant implications of the text.  In short, this is what Pace sees as interpretation. Once the text has been interpreted it should be explained how it applies to our daily lives. This is what Pace refers to as implementation. Pace explains, “Our exegetical study can provide a wealth of textual and theological insights, but information without application leads to frustration” (50). For Pace, the application is what provides people with guidance “to experience Christ’s victory in their lives” (50). Pace then ends the process by discussing the Finishing Touches. These topics include introductions, illustrations, and invitations.

From my perspective Preaching By The Book is a good resource for the new as well as for the seasoned preacher. It provides a very practical process for sermon preparation and still retains helpful reminders of the eternal importance and significance of sermon preparation. If I had to critique the book I would only have one, and that would be the section on the application. As a member of the laity, I have seen this done well and not so well. In short, I would like to see the application follow consistently with what Jesus or His disciples taught. Applications that spring out of thin air leave many of us in the pew’s wondering exactly where that came from. I would have liked to have seen this addressed in more detail.

My personal rating is 4 out of 5 stars.


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Book Review: the CSB World View Study Bible

I have had the CSB World View Study Bible for about a month and have come to truly enj9781433604348_CSB_WorldviewStudyBible_NAVY_LIDoy it. Beginning with the cover, it comes in 3 different options: grey and black cloth over board, genuine brown leather, and imitation leather in navy blue. It is a study Bible so there is some bulk to it, but it’s still compact enough to tote around.    When you open the Bible you will notice a readable size font, commentary at the bottom of the page and scripture references down the middle of the page. Each book begins with an introduction providing background information, a very helpful timeline, and worldview elements covering teachings about God, teachings about humanity, and teachings about salvation. In the back of the Bible, there is a very nice concordance and of course the maps.

What I found that makes this Bible even more useful are the worldview articles. The articles are specifically Christian worldview and are written by some of the most prominent Christian writers today. I read somewhere that there were over 130 articles written by over 120 authors. These articles range in topics from An Introduction To A Christian World View by Trevin Wax, to A History of Christianity’s Impact on Governments by Carl R. Trueman, Christians and Suffering by Christy Hill, A New Atheism by Al Moler, Ethics Of Personal Evangelism Thom S. Rainer, The Incarnation of Jesus Christ Daniel Akin the list goes on. One of my favorites so far was Timothy George on the Holy Trinity. I can’t say enough about the variety of topics and the quality of the writing.

My personal rating is 5 out of 5 stars.


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

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BOOK REVIEW God’s Book of Proverbs: Biblical Wisdom Arranged by Topic

GodsbookofprovThe book of Proverbs in the Bible is enjoyed by many for its “practical wisdom.”  Proverbs, as you may already know, is a series of truth claims like “Trust in the Lord with all of your heart, and do not rely on your own understanding.” Notice how insightful the statement is as it acknowledges man’s lack of understanding and encourages man’s trust in the Lord. Fan’s of the book of Proverbs are in good company since King Solomon (usually attributed with the authorship of Proverbs) was known as an avid proverbialist since his “… wisdom surpassed the wisdom of all the people of the east and all the wisdom of Egypt…He also spoke 3,000 proverbs.” That’s a lot.

We are all edified by the wisdom found in Proverbs and that is why I truly enjoyed reading God’s Book of Proverbs: Biblical Wisdom Arranged by Topic (GBP). GBP consists of the entire book of Proverbs which you would find in your Bible organized by topic. For example, if you are looking for a proverb having to do with friendship. You would first go to the index and look up “Friendship” which would direct you to page 41 where you would find the passages in Proverbs dealing with friendship. There is also a table of contents that gives you a more general list of categories. I found this to be helpful when just reading topically and not looking for something specific. As the subtitle reads this is truly Biblical wisdom arranged by topic.

GBP is an attractive hardcover volume. The publisher has chosen to use the Christian Standard Bible translation giving this volume the Optimal Equivalence between the original language and common everyday English. It is compact in size and can easily fit in a backpack or purse. My personal rating is 5 out of 5 Stars.


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

 

 

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The Theological Interpretation of Scripture: A Very Brief Introduction

The Theological Interpretation of Scripture (TIS) has become a topic of discussion among academic authors like, Francis Watson, Daniel Treier, Kevin Van Hoozer, and Stephen Fowl. Right from the beginning the name itself sounds like something we shouldn’t be doing. It is as if we are allowing our beliefs to determine what scripture says. While that does happen in many quarters, it’s not the case with TIS. Actually those who are involved in TIS see it more as a recovery of premodern hermeneutics (Bible interpretation). The argument is that modernist hermeneutics, like the Grammatical Historical (GH) method, have not lived up to their promise in providing a method of a truly unified reading of scripture. Some have suggested that the GH method leaves us with interpretive pluralities where each interpreter has the final say on what Scripture says.

So as you can probably imagine this would create a few challenges. If Scripture is the means by which God speaks then It ought to be read as a whole. This first came to my mind many years ago when I suggested that what we were looking for in our interpretation of Scripture was author intentionality in the text. That is to say we wanted to know what the human authors were trying to say. I can remember the conversation because a friend of mine returned and asked if I saw any ambiguity in this. That was when I started to look at other sources like John Calvin. At that point in my life I had only become familiar with Calvin through the Institutes of the Christian Religion which was helpful. However, reading through his commentaries I realized how different his hermeneutic and the hermeneutic of the Patristic homilies were compared to what I had seen in contemporary authors.

So just a recap on what has just been said. TIS places emphasis on the claim that God is the author of Scripture (2 Timothy 3:16) and therefore should be understood in light of the whole. Obviously there is much to say on this and I will have to discuss this in more detail as I work through it myself. But because the subject matter of the Old and New Testament is the Messiah or Jesus Christ (Luke 24:27, John 5:39) we have an essential unity that plays a big role in our exegesis (or what we come away with from the text). This is not to say that GH should be eradicated from our exegetical practice. But TIS does bring unity to the particulars left behind by GH.

What of the human authors of Scripture? I knew you were going to ask that. As I stated above on the ambiguity of author intentionality, the challenge is our inability to definitively map out what the writers intention actually is. TIS seeks to clarify that the author’s intention is what is found in the text. It is God who is the author of Scripture who can make His intention known through the centuries to His people. This last move makes the church the primary context of Biblical interpretation.

I know this was brief but I hope it has prompted you to ask questions about your own method of interpretation. Maybe you can share with me some of your conclusions as I don’t have too many of my own yet. If you are interested I have listed some literature that has contributed to the discussion of TIS below.


Treir, Daniel J. Introducing Theological Interpretation of Scripture: Recovering a Christian Practice. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2008.

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Book Review: The Resurrection Fact

The Resurrection Fact: Responding to Modern Critiques is a collection of essay by various scholars addressing critiques and demonstrating the evidences for the resurrection of Jesus. Because the resurrection is so central to the Christian faith it resfacbecomes the bases upon which the church stands or falls. As the apostle Paul says in his letter to the church in Corinth, “And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins.” Such a significant point of the faith has not been left without evidences and these evidences should be shared if for no other reason than to exalt the Lord of glory.

What I found interesting about the book is the contributors to the volume. Each of them comes from a specialized field of study (Law, History, Philosophy, etc.) which they apply in their responses to topics such as, skepticism of the New Testament, the events of Good Friday and Easter, the role of faith and evidence for the resurrection, and the historicity of the resurrection. Each contributor is in dialogue with a modern day critic which I found to be very useful. This is not a rehashing of the same old arguments. The writers of the Resurrection Fact are dealing with contemporary critics which offers a fresh new look at these important issues.

As far a my own criticism goes I can’t think of any. However as tradition would have it they wont come to me till after I have completed the review. However, I can anticipate someone being apprehensive about reading a book on apologetics written by academicians. My response is to not be. It is important to have individuals who understand the issues write a response. That is a given. However, reading above your comfort level will only make you a better reader and thinking.

I personally rank this book a 5 out of 5.

 


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature

Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature

Richard A. Taylor, Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature: An Exegetical Handbook

Kregel Publications, 2016, 205pp., ISBN 978-0-8254-2761-9.

Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature is sixth in the Handbooks For Old Testament Exegesis series by David M. Howard Jr. Taylor’s book is a step forward in the right direction for Old Testament exegesis. Avoiding the pitfall of assuming that all text should be interpreted in very same way Taylor opens the book by giving some foundational insight in to the type of literature the apocalyptic genre is.  He writes,

The expression apocalyptic literature refers to a type of writing that adopts to a significant degree the outlook of apocalypticism and portrays those themes through a vivid use of symbolic language.

Taylor spends the entire first chapter explaining the foundation of apocalyptic literature, defining terms, and talking method for understanding apocalyptic literature. In so doing he has established a solid start point for the discussion.  From here he explains seven major apocalyptic themes (chapter 2), basic guidelines for apocalyptic interpretation (chapter 4), teaching apocalyptic literature (chapter 5), and ends by providing sample apocalyptic texts (chapter 6).

Interpreting Apocalyptic literature is a well written and very necessary introduction to the topic of apocalyptic literature. At 205 pages it isn’t going to delve into every instance of apocalyptic literature found in the Bible. However the strengths in the volume is it’s easy to read style providing the pastor, seminarian, or laity with a solid resource for reading and understanding this particular genre.

RATING 4 out of 5


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Quote Of The Day: Baptist Faith & Message on Humanity

“The sacredness of human personality is evident in that God created man in His own image,… therefore, every person of every race possesses full dignity and is worthy of respect and Christian love”.

 

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