Monthly Archives: April 2016

BOOK REVIEW: 40 Questions About The Historical Jesus

Product Details

40 Questions About The Historical Jesus by C. Marvin Pate (PhD. Marquette University) is a very useful resource on this very important topic. There have been books published that are somewhat similar for a more popular audience, but 40 Questions About The Historical Jesus is written in a no nonsense straight forward way sparing the reader from the type of sensationalism that commonly characterizes such topics in exchange for solid well researched answers about the historical Jesus.

 

The recent advent of many popularized books and specials on the Discovery channel warrant such a work to vindicate the historical Jesus from revisionists attempts to downplay our Lord’s historical significance. What makes this book so reader friendly is that Pate deals with individual issues in a question answer format, hence the title. The book is broken down into four parts. Part one begins with background information about the historical Jesus to lay a foundation if you will for what comes in parts 2, 3, and 4. This portion of the book might be found to be slightly academic as Pate deals with topics like the reliability of the Gospel books, Biblical criticism, the role of the Old Testament and its relationship to the New, and more. In this section I found his discussion of the apocryphal gospels to be very helpful and informative.

 

Part 1 lays the foundation for what follows.  In part 2 Pate answers questions about Jesus and His childhood. Such questions had to do with the virgin birth, why the virgin birth is even relevant, did Jesus have siblings, and what language did Jesus speak. Part 3 answers questions pertaining to Jesus’ life and teaching. Here Pate discusses Jesus’ teaching, His central message, and an interesting discussion of Jesus’ prediction of the fall of Jerusalem in AD 70 as well as His eschatology. Part 4 is a very well written treatment of the crucifixion and resurrection. Some of the questions that Pate answers have to do with the Triumphal Entry, who was responsible for Jesus’ death, why did Jesus die, where did Jesus’ Spirit go while He was in the tomb.

 

The book has some great features. It includes an ancient source index as well as a Scripture index. Pate also uses many charts to help the reader internalize data. What I also found helpful is each question ends with review questions making it ideal for group reading. The question answer format give the reader the liberty to read questions independently or it can be read cover to cover. Either way it’s a great reference tool have.

Personal rating is 5 STARS out of 5.

  • Series: 40 Questions & Answers Series
  • Paperback: 408 pages
  • Publisher: Kregel Academic (April 27, 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0825442842
  • ISBN-13: 978-0825442841

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Quote

“Without the resurrection, Christianity devolves into a strange moral

philosophy. ” -Author Unknown

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Unbelievable? Are the Gospels based on eyewitness testimony? Bart Ehrman vs Richard Bauckham: Saturday 09 April 2016 2:30:00 pm – Premier Christian Radio

Bart Ehrman’s new book ‘Jesus Before the Gospels’ makes the case that the stories about Jesus would have changed and evolved before they were written down as the Gospels.Richard Bauckham, author of ‘Jesus and the Eyewitnesses’, defends the view that the Gospels were written by those with access to eyewitness testimony of Jesus’ first followers. They debate who wrote Mark, whether the the Gospels came from anonymous traditions and how they received their titles.

Source: Unbelievable? Are the Gospels based on eyewitness testimony? Bart Ehrman vs Richard Bauckham: Saturday 09 April 2016 2:30:00 pm – Premier Christian Radio

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Bible Reading 101

As Christians, Bible reading is an important aspect to our faith. We believe the 66 books of the cannon of Scripture make up God’s word to us. Therefore, it is important for us to have a healthy reading diet. However, the challenge we face is how should the text of Scripture, God’s word to us, be read? This kind of question can actually fill volumes and be argued and debated so much so that a person would have a difficult time knowing what’s right. To add to our complexity many people just choose not to attempt to understand basic Bible reading. Obviously, we all know how to read, what else is needed?

I don’t mind discussing some of the fine points of Biblical interpretation (formally known as hermeneutics) but at this point, what is really needed is just some very basic understanding of key concepts to help analyze and understand the text. Therefore, I will be looking at three very fundamental points to help understand what is being read in the Bible. They are, what I call, reading redemptively, exigetically, and eisegetically. I will go into definitions of these terms below.

Redemptively, goes without saying. We cannot deny the work of the Spirit in our lives as well as in our Bible reading. No one approaches the Bible autonomously or without influence. If you are a believer you will read the Bible from the perspective of God’s sovereign authority. The natural man, as Paul tells us, suppresses the truth that he/she has about God and thus reads the Bible from the perspective of their own ultimate authority. Reading the Scriptures redemptively does not guarantee you a perfect read because we aren’t perfect people but it is the start point.

Reading the Bible exegetically, remember this ten cent term, trust me you are going to want to cash in on it some day. Reading the Bible exegetically is a descriptive approach where one seeks to understand the text apart from any opinions, feelings, stream of consciousness type stuff, etc. In other words one attempts to remove any subjectivity from their understanding of the text and attempts to read what the text is communicating. Just look at the exegesis, the prefix “ex” means to “come out of”. In exegetical reading, the information comes out of the text. If you are in a building that’s on fire what do you look for? The “ex”it sign because you want to come out of the building. CAUTION, this is a very disciplined task and requires patience and an inquisitive mind on the part of the reader. Some of the questions one might ask himself/herself are:

  • What type of genre (style of writing) is this?
  • What is the context? (this one is a biggie)
  • What do these certain words mean?
  • What is the author communicating?

There are others you might come up with but this is a good list to get you started. Remember, the goal is to think about the text on its own terms without imposing assumptions.

Lastly, one can read the Bible eisegetically. To be perfectly candid, this is the one that gets many Bible teachers in trouble, let me explain. An eisegetical reading of the text will always communicate what the reader thinks of the text as opposed to what the text actually says itself. Think of the prefix “eis” which means “into” because one is positing their thoughts “into” the text. This is dangerous business.

Now that I have given the precautionary warning  I am going to back peddle a bit. The reason is, there are situations where an eisegetical reading is warranted. The first one that comes to mind is once there has been a thorough exegetical reading. An impatient reader would rather bypass the exegetical reading and go straight for the eisgetical reading. However the best forms of eisegesis will showcase a thorough exegesis. One easy way to look at this is exegesis will ask what the author believes. Eisegesis on the other hand asks what the reader ought to believe.

This is a basic approach to reading the Bible. There are many sub-issues that would fall under these three categories or redemptive, exegetical, and eisegetical but for the purpose of this post one would do very well if he/she would keep these in mind during Bible study.

 

 

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Bible Sufficient For Meaningful Living?

These numbers look to be a little low. However, something to think about; with the Church focus on attracting the “younger generation” over the past decades these numbers are ironic. Could it possibly be that our efforts at making amends with the “younger generation” has actually had the reverse effect?

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