Meditations On Labor Day

In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground

Years ago Lover Boy came out with a hit song entitled Working For The Weekend. You might remember it, “everybody’s working for the weekend, everybody wants a new romance”. If we are candid with ourselves we might recall singing the same song especially on Monday morning. No doubt this was a catchy tune however it is actually a poor work ethic (no disrespect to Lover Boy).

Many people today feel a lack of purpose in their vocation. Being over worked under paid under appreciated all factor in to the worker who is “working for the weekend”. Ironically this flies in the face of what was known as the “protestant work ethic” that drove this country from its inception.

The “protestant work ethic” sprung out of the Protestant Reformation teaching that God is the Creator of all including legitimate vocational callings. Thus, in taking up one’s vocation she is not only serving her Creator but serving her neighbor as well. This perspective gave vocation meaning and purpose.

What we have seen in contemporary America is the erosion of Christian theology which has not only affected the culture but even the church. That coupled with other factors has everyone singing “everybody’s working for the weekend.” But such an ethic dishonors God and if enough people adopt this philosophy the next logical step is a negative view of work where the goal isn’t to give a 100% but rather to figure out ways to make more money by doing less work. That is not a good place to be.

Something to keep in mind. Scripture tells us to glorify God in all that we do (1 Cor. 10:31; Rom. 15:7; 1 Pet. 4:11). So let us glorify Him in our vocation. The word “vocation” comes from the Latin “vocare” meaning “to call” or “to summons.” The verb of which is related to “vox” which is the  Latin noun for “voice”. Who’s call? who’s voice? God’s, because our vocation is a call from God.

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